About

An American presidential election is not a general election where the person with the most votes wins the office. An American presidential election is actually fifty-one (51) separate contests. Each American state, plus the District of Columbia, is worth a certain number of votes in the Electoral College. The candidate who wins the most votes in the state wins all the votes in the Electoral College that that state controls. The number of votes a state holds in the Electoral College is based on the number of Representatives and Senators in Congress that state has. The District of Columbia is a special case. It has no voting Representatives in Congress and no Senators, but it does control three votes in the Electoral College. There are 538 votes in the Electoral College and an American presidential candidate needs to win 270 of those votes to become the President of the United States.

The aim of this blog is to follow the thirteen swing states that will decide the 2016 American presidential election.

Those baker’s dozen of states – and the 155 votes in the Electoral College that they are worth – are Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Nevada, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

This blog will also look at the other thirty-seven states plus the District of Columbia just so that nobody feels left out.

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TL:DR for the blog…

As of May 5, 2016 my starting point tally of the 2016 American presidential election is as follows:

Excluding the thirteen swing states listed above, the Republican Party nominee can rely on winning twenty-two (22) states for 181 votes in the Electoral College. The nominee from the Democartic Party can rely on winning sixteen (16) states for a total of 202 votes in the Electoral College.

There are thirteen (13) states and 155 votes in the Electoral College up for grabs.

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